Author: Courtney Zhu

Courtney is a junior studying Journalism and Global Health, while pursuing the pre-medical track. Passionate about global health policy and management, she wants to better understand the health outcomes of vulnerable populations and how social determinants shape them. At Northwestern, she is involved with the Global Engagement Summit and works at a neonatology lab at the Feinberg Medical School downtown.

Maintaining passion for public health during residency: an alumna interview with Divya Mallampati (Weinberg 2009)

Divya Mallampati graduated from the Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences in 2009. She was a pre-medical student majoring in Anthropology and minoring in Global Health Studies. She discovered her passion for anthropology in her Freshman Seminar, “The Anthropology of Violence.” That course spurred a curiosity–one that would resonate till today–about the treatment of women’s

Alumni discuss post-graduation experiences in panel

The Program in Global Health Studies welcomed back five alumni for a panel discussion to discuss their post-graduation experiences on Thursday, May 19. “This year, we have one of our biggest graduating classes of minors. We’re in the early stages of developing plans for an adjunct major in global health. In addition, there’s an ongoing

Northwestern law students present recent international fieldwork

The Northwestern Pritzker School of Law’s clinical program, the Bluhm Legal Clinic, provides students with a direct, real-world experience representing clients and serving as advocates. On Thursday, April 14, the Center of International Human Rights–one of the clinic’s 14 centers–held its annual presentation for global fieldwork research. Two of the four works presented were part

Flint Water Crisis: a story of environmental racism

In April of 2014, the city of Flint, Michigan changed its water source from Lake Huron to the Flint River as a cost-saving measure. Filled with industrial chemicals, waste, sewage, and road salts, this river was undoubtedly unfit for drinking. Immediate complaints about its unusual odor, taste, and color were ignored. The local government turned